Issue 1
Articles
Rasquache Rhetorics: A Cultural Rhetorics Sensibility

Rasquache Rhetorics: a cultural rhetorics sensibility

by Kelly Medina-López

"Rasquache as cultural rhetorics theory and practice presents a robust approach to meaning making by allowing users to pull from the compendium of theories, ideas, experiences, tangible tools, and intangible epistemologies they can access. Recycling, upcycling, making do, and making new meaning through whatever is available is an explicit performance of rasquache."

Beyoncé’s Performance Of Identification As A Diamond: Reclaiming Bodies And Voices In “Formation”

Beyoncé’s Performance of Identification as a Diamond: Reclaiming Bodies and Voices in “Formation”

by Mari Ramler

"Beyoncé won the 2017 Grammys in the same way she won the 2016 Super Bowl—by rewriting history with her flesh. To write skin is, like birth, to create futures."

What Fucking Clayton Pettet Teaches Us About Cultural Rhetorics

What Fucking Clayton Pettet Teaches Us About Cultural Rhetorics

by Becca Hayes, Kathleen Livingston, Casey Miles, Jon M. Wargo, Ames Hawkins, Ezekiel Choffel, Steven Hammer, Erin Schaefer, and Les Hutchinson

"We acknowledge the dissonance and disjointedness this project entails. Therefore, we provide no exhaustive remarks or conclusions, but rather a constellation of queer provocations. We work to render the 'queer' intelligible by making the piece and our responses to it seemingly unintelligible to heteronormative cultural logics."

Pedagogy Blog
Listening To Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

by Christina V. Cedillo, Victor Del Hierro, Lisa Michelle King, Jessie Male, Staci Perryman-Clark, Andrea Riley-Mukavetz, and Amy Vidali

"[A cultural rhetorics practice] means to consider your own story, and how your position contributes to your understanding of that story, but it also means to consider all the other stories that aren’t being told, or aren’t be heard, or aren’t being heard by the majority. It asks—is anything sacred?"