Issue 3

Never Forget: Ground Zero, Park51, and Constitutive Rhetorics

Never Forget: Ground Zero, Park51, and Constitutive Rhetorics

by Tamara Issak“The Park51 uproar had a ripple effect on Muslim communities throughout America with reports of arson, vandalism, and violence at mosques. The shutdown of Park51 was another reminder that the constitutional right to practice religion freely and build houses of worship does not apply to Muslims.”

Who Is Looking?: De-centering the Distant Spectator in Visual Rhetorics of Violence

Who Is Looking?: De-centering the Distant Spectator in Visual Rhetorics of Violence

by Megan Eatman
“While approaching violence through assemblage is risky, the work of destabilizing dominant ways of looking cannot happen solely through written analysis. Visual production offers different ways of knowing for both maker and spectator, and violence is too prevalent and significant a problem to lay aside any tools available to reckon with it.”

Academic #BlackLivesMatter: Black Faculty and Graduate Students Tell Their Stories

Academic #BlackLivesMatter: Black Faculty and Graduate Students Tell Their Stories

by Sharieka Botex, Michelle Grue, Alicia Hatcher, Eric House, and Sherita Roundtree “How has the university reflected on and named their own issues with systemic racism and oppression? How have they taken a closer look at how much money has been allocated toward campus police in comparison to developing programs and initiatives that actively challenge white supremacy within the campus climate?”

Recognizing New Styles: How Graduate Students Are Coping with COVID

Recognizing New Styles: How Graduate Students Are Coping with COVID

by D’Arcee Charington, Dylan Colvin, and B López
“COVID-19 demonstrates the kind of support—both monetary and emotional support—that is needed to succeed. I feel like there is more exigence now while we are still in this pandemic. I think that graduate students can support one another by advocating for BIPOC students and other folks in the margins who need more from the university.” — B López.

Care in Times of Crisis: How Faculty Are Managing COVID

Care in Times of Crisis: How Faculty Are Managing COVID

by Garrett Bridger Gilmore, Al Harahap, Jamila Kareem, and Helen Sandoval
“I had a minor breakdown due to all the stress—the panic set in and I just began to cry because it was all too much (being a mother to my children, being a good teacher, colleague, and activist for equity, diversity, and inclusion in my writing program).”

Pedagogy Blog

(Re)Composing Our Consent: Critical Digital Literacies as Remixed Terms of Service

(Re)Composing Our Consent: Critical Digital Literacies as Remixed Terms of Service

A small part of a cultural rhetorics approach to critical digital literacies is asking students to remix for target audiences that are vulnerable to the exploitation of their data based on their use. By constellating the ways in which users compose and navigate social media, the ToS remix project recomposes the doctrine of consent, allowing users to reclaim how that information is understood, communicated, and delivered.

Considering the Possibilities of a Cultural Rhetorics Assessment Framework

Considering the Possibilities of a Cultural Rhetorics Assessment Framework

In this particular moment, finding something queerly useful within assessment structures will be painful and frustrating as our institutions push us to keep doing what we have always done. But finding something, anything, in the pain we are feeling, the frustration we are carrying, the work we can/will no longer do illustrates what might be possible in the here and now.

Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

by Christina V. Cedillo, Victor Del Hierro, Candace Epps-Robertson, Lisa Michelle King, Jessie Male, Staci Perryman-Clark, Andrea Riley-Mukavetz, and Amy Vidali

“[A cultural rhetorics practice] means to consider your own story, and how your position contributes to your understanding of that story, but it also means to consider all the other stories that aren’t being told, or aren’t be heard, or aren’t being heard by the majority. It asks—is anything sacred?”

Issue 2

Ready for the long and wondrous road ahead: an introduction to issue 2 of constellations

Ready for the long and wondrous road ahead: an introduction to issue 2 of constellations

by Alexandra Hidalgo, editor-in-chief

“As they tenaciously place one foot in front of the other during their long existences, journals take copious unexpected and often electrifying turns. They perform some cryptic alchemy, blending the contributions of editors, authors, reviewers, and readers to fashion their own identities and personalities.”

A Settler Archive:  A Site for a Decolonial Praxis Project

A Settler Archive: A Site for a Decolonial Praxis Project

by Romeo García

“Settler archives haunt us all. In reading its contents, I gain a greater understanding of my brown(ed) body. Settler archives demand a carefully reckoning, to be sure, with erasure, death, terror, trauma, and settler invention practices, all of which affect how and why I speak today from a particular place, out of a particular history, and from a particular community practice.”

The University of Utah “Utes:” Towards Increased Rhetorical Sovereignty

The University of Utah “Utes:” Towards Increased Rhetorical Sovereignty

by Cassidy Hoff

“The University of Utah Department of Athletics’ (or University of Utah Athletics Department) media guides released from 1990-2016 in the sports of gymnastics, men’s and women’s basketball, and football highlight the way the university utilizes the “Utes” nickname, circle and feathers logo, and Swoop mascot to construct a “Ute” brand. This “Ute” brand encompasses the logo, mascot, and nickname, and also a “Ute” identity that can be assumed and performed by athletes, fans, spectators, and media.”

The Historical Work of Cultural Rhetorics: Constellating Indigenous, Deaf, and English-Only Literacies

The Historical Work of Cultural Rhetorics: Constellating Indigenous, Deaf, and English-Only Literacies

by Sarah Klotz

“While off-reservation boarding schools devastated indigenous language and kinship structures, they also generated inter-tribal coalitions that laid the groundwork for new waves of Indigenous activism in the twentieth century. In what follows, I read a series of artifacts from the Carlisle archive to explore how comparative cultural rhetorics work can benefit from the fine-grained inquiry that archival research affords.”