Catheryn Jennings

Ready for the long and wondrous road ahead: an introduction to issue 2 of constellations

Ready for the long and wondrous road ahead: an introduction to issue 2 of constellations

by Alexandra Hidalgo, editor-in-chief

“As they tenaciously place one foot in front of the other during their long existences, journals take copious unexpected and often electrifying turns. They perform some cryptic alchemy, blending the contributions of editors, authors, reviewers, and readers to fashion their own identities and personalities.”

A Settler Archive:  A Site for a Decolonial Praxis Project

A Settler Archive: A Site for a Decolonial Praxis Project

by Romeo García

“Settler archives haunt us all. In reading its contents, I gain a greater understanding of my brown(ed) body. Settler archives demand a carefully reckoning, to be sure, with erasure, death, terror, trauma, and settler invention practices, all of which affect how and why I speak today from a particular place, out of a particular history, and from a particular community practice.”

The University of Utah “Utes:” Towards Increased Rhetorical Sovereignty

The University of Utah “Utes:” Towards Increased Rhetorical Sovereignty

by Cassidy Hoff

“The University of Utah Department of Athletics’ (or University of Utah Athletics Department) media guides released from 1990-2016 in the sports of gymnastics, men’s and women’s basketball, and football highlight the way the university utilizes the “Utes” nickname, circle and feathers logo, and Swoop mascot to construct a “Ute” brand. This “Ute” brand encompasses the logo, mascot, and nickname, and also a “Ute” identity that can be assumed and performed by athletes, fans, spectators, and media.”

The Historical Work of Cultural Rhetorics: Constellating Indigenous, Deaf, and English-Only Literacies

The Historical Work of Cultural Rhetorics: Constellating Indigenous, Deaf, and English-Only Literacies

by Sarah Klotz

“While off-reservation boarding schools devastated indigenous language and kinship structures, they also generated inter-tribal coalitions that laid the groundwork for new waves of Indigenous activism in the twentieth century. In what follows, I read a series of artifacts from the Carlisle archive to explore how comparative cultural rhetorics work can benefit from the fine-grained inquiry that archival research affords.”