Pedagogy Blog Posts

Online Learning in a Time of Crisis: Using Physical Distance and Digital Space to Develop Learning Communities

Online Learning in a Time of Crisis: Using Physical Distance and Digital Space to Develop Learning Communities

If “cultures are made up of practices that accumulate over time and in relationship to specific places” (Powell, et al.), how do we co-create that culture alongside students in online classes without the “physical geographies” we can re-make together? What happens when we are never in the same physical place/space with each other? When we have no shared past to remember?

(Re)Composing Our Consent: Critical Digital Literacies as Remixed Terms of Service

(Re)Composing Our Consent: Critical Digital Literacies as Remixed Terms of Service

A small part of a cultural rhetorics approach to critical digital literacies is asking students to remix for target audiences that are vulnerable to the exploitation of their data based on their use. By constellating the ways in which users compose and navigate social media, the ToS remix project recomposes the doctrine of consent, allowing users to reclaim how that information is understood, communicated, and delivered.

Considering the Possibilities of a Cultural Rhetorics Assessment Framework

Considering the Possibilities of a Cultural Rhetorics Assessment Framework

In this particular moment, finding something queerly useful within assessment structures will be painful and frustrating as our institutions push us to keep doing what we have always done. But finding something, anything, in the pain we are feeling, the frustration we are carrying, the work we can/will no longer do illustrates what might be possible in the here and now.

Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

Listening to Stories: Practicing Cultural Rhetorics Pedagogy

by Christina V. Cedillo, Victor Del Hierro, Candace Epps-Robertson, Lisa Michelle King, Jessie Male, Staci Perryman-Clark, Andrea Riley-Mukavetz, and Amy Vidali

“[A cultural rhetorics practice] means to consider your own story, and how your position contributes to your understanding of that story, but it also means to consider all the other stories that aren’t being told, or aren’t be heard, or aren’t being heard by the majority. It asks—is anything sacred?”